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Save the Dates

22st Annual OLC International Conference
November 16-18, 2016 | Orlando, Florida | Walt Disney World Swan/Dolphin Resort

OLC Innovate 2016 - Innovations in Blended and Online Learning
April 20-22, 2016 | New Orleans, LA | Sheraton New Orleans Hotel

Different Instructional Methods Utilized by Blended Vs Traditional Business Undergraduate Students

#Twitter: 
#blended09193
Presenter(s)
Elizabeth Anderson (University of Denver, USA)
Scott Toney (University of Denver, USA)
Session Information
July 9, 2014 - 9:10am
Track: 
Teaching & Learning Effectiveness
Areas of Special Interest: 
Blended Course
Major Emphasis of Presentation: 
Research and Evaluation
Institutional Level: 
Multiple Levels
Audience Level: 
All
Session Type: 
Information Session
Location: 
Plaza Court 1
Session Duration: 
50 Minutes
Session: 
Information Session 4
Abstract

Research exploring instructional methods students in a blended course utilized more often and found more useful than students in a traditional structured course.

Extended Abstract

This research explored which instructional methods students in a blended course utilized more often and found more useful than students in a traditional structured course. The presentation highlights mixed repeated measure analysis results. The most interesting differences were the perceived usefulness of screencasts and in-class hands-on projects.

In recent years the boom of distance learning in both K-12 and higher education has been apparent. Reports have indicated that online and blended course offerings and enrollments have increased at a rate of over 30% each year across the United States (Carlson, 2004). As educational technology advances there becomes a need for data and research to understand how the technology is affecting student learning. To date research studies have explored the differences between traditional and blended learning environments in higher education (McCray, 2000; Roscoe, 2012; Utts et al., 2003; Ward, 2004). Studies found that there was no difference in student performance between traditional and blended courses (McCray, 2000; Utts et al., 2003; Ward, 2004) but there is still debate in the differences in student attitudes and perceptions between traditional and blended courses (Jackson et al., 2008; Lopez-Perez, 2011).

In this study the researchers explore the use of specific instructional methods in traditional and blended learning environments for otherwise identical undergraduate Business Analytics courses. This research study included three class sections, two class sections were delivered in the traditional lecture format and one class section was a blended model. All class sections had similar demographics, with undergraduate business students ranging in age from 18 to 24 (87.8% under the age of 20), 70.2% Caucasian and 78.4% selected English as their first/primary language. A total of 98 students participated in the study with 68 students enrolled in one of two traditional class sections and 30 students enrolled in the blended class section. The traditional class sections met twice a week for 2.5 hours per day, whereas the blended class met once a week for 2.5 hours per day coupled with 2.5 hours a week of screencasts to replace the traditional lectures. All class sections took four tests and a final in a face-to-face setting. The main difference between the traditional class sections and the blended class was the amount of in-class, student-instructor, and student-student time. Besides the screencasts that replaced lectures for the blended class, all students had access to the online resources, as well as participated in the same in-class hands on activities.

Using an analysis of covariance with prerequisite course grade as the covariate, no statistically significant main effects of class type (traditional/blended) were found, indicating that there was no statistically significant difference in mean student performance between the traditional class sections and the blended class sections. A mixed repeated measures analysis was conducted on the data collected from the Instructional Methods Survey. The most interesting differences were the perceived usefulness of screencasts and in-class hands-on projects.

This research study not only contributes to the debate on blended/blended learning in higher education but also contributes to the foundation of research that has the potential to identify optimal student types for blended learning. By identifying students who would benefit from blended course options before enrollment would enable advisors to more fully support student course selection.